Press Releases

  • The Highest Standards and Ethics

    June 15, 2021
    A note from Suzi Watford and Emma Moody: Dear Colleague, Earlier this year we launched our news literacy initiative in partnership with the News Literacy Project (NLP). This is a long-term, company-wide effort to provide our customers, and also our colleagues, insights into the differences between news, analysis and commentary and to help identify trustworthy sources. To be the source of truth for decision-makers, we need to ensure our members and customers can trust what we publish every day. We kicked things off with a focus on educating readers and future members on the differences between The Wall Street Journal’s News and Opinion sections, including guidance on how we distinguish between the two on WSJ.com. In part two of this ongoing campaign, we are bringing attention to the importance of standards and ethics in the WSJ newsroom. We’ve created a powerful video that captures the central role standards and ethics plays in The Wall Street Journal’s journalism and how it connects to our mission of fostering trust. Click on the link below to watch it and visit newsliteracy.wsj.com to learn more. The Wall Street Journal has a longstanding tradition of producing ambitious, fact-based journalism of the highest standard. In the newsroom, the Standards & Ethics team works closely with journalists throughout the reporting process to help safeguard this tradition and remain fair, accurate and impartial across coverage areas. Whether it’s an article, a video or a podcast, the Standards & Ethics team is dedicated to ensuring we fairly present all sides of the story through rigorous, fact-based reporting. Having this team of experienced journalists embedded in the newsroom is something that really sets the Journal apart. We all should be really proud of our journalism and the practices in place to ensure it’s always fair, factual and balanced. We encourage you to share this video. Remember, no matter whether you work in one of the newsrooms or elsewhere across the business, we all play a role in actively living up to the standards and ethics that make Dow Jones uniquely trusted. Suzi Watford, EVP, Consumer, Dow Jones Emma Moody, Editor, Standards and Ethics, The Wall Street Journal
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  • Wall Street Journal reporter Chao Deng wins the Livingston Award for International Reporting

    June 10, 2021
    A note from Matt Murray: Dear All, Please join me in congratulating Chao Deng of the China bureau, who was honored today with the Livingston Award for Young Journalists in International Reporting. In a challenging year that pushed all of us to produce urgent and pressing work, the work of Chao—like that of our entire China team—has stood out for its sweep and power. The Journal had already sent four staffers to Wuhan when it was locked down in February 2020, and two more had been stopped and detained by authorities just outside the city trying to get into the lockdown zone. Chao bravely decided to go there anyway. She stuffed as much PPE as she could fit into a suitcase and took the train from Beijing, having heard that trains passing through the city stopped on the platform long enough for someone to try and talk her way off the train and into the city. It worked. For the next few weeks, Chao—joined later by our researcher Kersten Zhang—donned protective covering and headed into the hospitals at the original center of the pandemic. Along with Kersten, Chao was one of fewer than half a dozen journalists for foreign media outlets in Wuhan during the lockdown, providing a counterpoint to Beijing’s later account of that crucial period of history. Together, they produced powerful stories from the front lines, capturing chaotic scenes that would later play out in Italy, Brazil, India, the U.S. and elsewhere. In doing so, they offered the world one of very few truly independent perspectives on what took place in Wuhan during those critical days. They took on considerable risk in heading towards a virus that was still little understood, and in telling a tale that deviated from Beijing’s emerging portrayal of its early response to the virus as one that was firm and effective. They took us into overcrowded hospitals with overworked doctors and introduced us to low-level Communist Party cadres making life-or-death decisions in Wuhan’s residential communities. Here is some of their work: http://www.wsj.com/articles/coronavirus-patients-in-wuhan-face-a-health-system-past-the-brink-11581084599 http://www.wsj.com/articles/at-outbreaks-center-wuhan-residents-question-accuracy-of-virus-tests-11581454218 http://www.wsj.com/articles/in-wuhan-chinas-residential-committees-fight-outbreak-on-front-line-11581717012 On February 19, China ordered Chao’s expulsion from the country and stripped Chao and Kersten of their press credentials, effective immediately. They were confined to their Wuhan hotel for more than a month before they were allowed to return to Beijing and, in Chao’s case, put on a flight out of the country. Chao is now based in Taipei, where she continues to produce journalism of depth and distinction for our readers. Chao’s honor is well deserved, and worthy of our gratitude and admiration. It’s also a reminder of how many of you, like Chao, found yourselves in unusual, challenging and even dangerous circumstances last year. In celebrating her, we are all reminded that the need for and power of deeply reported, compelling and insightful journalism has never been greater. Matt
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  • Dow Jones appoints Matthew Hutchison to Chief Communications Officer

    May 20, 2021
    A note from Almar Latour: Colleagues, We’re pleased to share that Matthew Hutchison is appointed Chief Communications Officer for Dow Jones. Matthew will oversee our corporate communications at a time of significant change and sharp digital growth at Dow Jones, making it more important than ever to share our story with clarity, consistency and purpose, both internally and externally. In addition, he will help develop the strategy for our Corporate Social Responsibility efforts. Matthew has a strong background in media and tech, having had communications roles at Apple, CBS, Dell, MTV/Viacom and, most recently, Forbes, where he served as Chief Communications Officer. His digital-first thinking—combined with a unique blend of media, technology and consumer messaging experience—makes him an ideal fit for Dow Jones as we press forward in our ambition to be the most impactful business and finance media company. Colleen Schwartz, SVP External Communications, who, along with the entire communications team, has so ably led our communications efforts through an exceptional period of success, disruption and transformation, will report to Matthew. I want to thank Colleen in particular for her leadership during this interim period. Matthew’s first day will be May 24. He will be based in New York and will report to me. Please join me in welcoming him to Dow Jones. Almar
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  • Covid-19 creates breeding ground for labor exploitation in corporate supply chains

    May 20, 2021
    Pandemic-related disruptions create a “perfect storm” for modern slavery to thrive — and business leaders need to be more vigilant to the risks, says Dow Jones New York [May, 20, 2021] – Companies could be unwittingly falling foul of anti-slavery laws as a result of the disruption caused by Covid-19, as new research from Dow Jones’s business information services division suggests. Released today, the report indicates that human traffickers have responded to lockdowns by diverting their focus away from sex work towards forms of labor exploitation that are more likely to be part of company supply chains. Distracted by the demands of the pandemic, many business leaders could be unaware of the rising risks.  These conclusions are based on analysis of over 30,000 global news articles from Factiva, Dow Jones’s global news database, alongside NGO case data from the Traffik Analysis Hub and conversations on Twitter.  According to the research, news coverage of supply chain disruption spiked by 2,000 percent in March 2020, as closed borders in the face of Covid-19 caused widespread material and labor shortages. Dow Jones’s findings suggest that traffickers were quick to respond and plug the gaps in those very supply chains. Labor exploitation overtook sexual exploitation as the most reported trafficking type following the onset of the pandemic, making up 41 percent of all cases reported to NGOs (other forms include trafficking for organ removal and criminal activities).  This is all happening at a time when business leaders have had to focus all their attention toward getting through the pandemic and managing its impact on operations. The result is a perfect storm for modern slavery to thrive in the operations of legitimate businesses, while eyes have been averted.  Although the risks have increased, the Dow Jones research found that Covid-19 has taken media focus away from the slavery industry, which generates $150bn in illegal profits a year. News coverage of modern slavery incidents fell by 25 percent between January and June 2020 compared to the previous year. In addition, the number of modern slavery cases reported to NGOs within the Traffik Analysis Hub dropped by 79 percent over the same period. But those NGOs say these figures reflect a shift in media priorities rather than a sign slavery is becoming less prevalent.  “We know from experience that slavery blooms in the dark, so a fall in reports about it rings alarm bells,” says Neil Giles, CEO of Traffik Analysis Hub. “It makes life much easier for traffickers if they can do their dirty work while no one’s looking. With governments, the media and companies all distracted by the pandemic, we strongly suspect modern slavery is actually as widespread as ever, if not more so.”  Although the pandemic has diverted attention away from the issue, certain sectors are facing growing public scrutiny. Media coverage linking financial services firms with modern slavery has risen by 131 percent, while the technology sector has seen a 25 percent increase.  Complacency about modern slavery poses legal and reputational risks for companies operating in countries like the UK and Australia, where they are required to demonstrate they have made efforts to eliminate slavery from their supply chains.  “Obviously, people should care about whether they’re participating in a global industry founded on capitalizing on human misery,” says Ingrid Verschuren, Head of Data Strategy at Dow Jones. “But modern slavery presents particular challenges when it comes to operating global supply chains, especially given the disruption created by Covid-19. Once headlines about the pandemic begin to recede, it will free up space for slavery to be back on the news agenda — and companies need to get ahead of the curve if they want to guarantee the integrity of their supply chains, and keep their names out of those headlines.” This report is the first in a new research series to come from Dow Jones’s business information services division and draws on analysis of news articles from Factiva and other data sources to help business leaders better understand the changing risk landscape and their potential impact. “The onset of Covid-19 has added a whole new layer of complexity and risk for corporate decision makers to navigate,” said Frank Filippo, EVP for Dow Jones’s business information services division. “Our world class data and content equips business leaders with insights that can help them and their organizations better manage risk in a fast changing global operating environment.” View the full research report here. ENDS About the research Analyzing 30,000 news articles obtained from 1,156 global media outlets via the Factiva API, in addition to Twitter data and modern slavery case information from the Traffik Analysis Hub, Dow Jones partnered with Edelman Data and Intelligence, a multidisciplinary research, analytics and data consultancy, to identify and document how global coverage of modern slavery has evolved in the age of Covid-19 – specifically for selected 6-month time comparisons in January-June 2019 and 2020.  About Dow Jones  Dow Jones is a global provider of news and business information, delivering content to consumers and organizations around the world across multiple formats, including print, digital, mobile and live events. Dow Jones has produced unrivaled quality content for more than 130 years and today has one of the world’s largest news-gathering operations globally. It produces leading publications and products including the flagship Wall Street Journal, America’s largest newspaper by paid circulation; Factiva, Barron’s, MarketWatch, Financial News, Dow Jones Risk & Compliance, and Dow Jones Newswires. Dow Jones is a division of News Corp (Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA; ASX: NWS, NWSLV). 
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